21 May, 2009

TOGAF 9 Migration Planning and Project Portfolio Management

Phase F in TOGAF helps to describe how to create a viable implementation and migration plan in co-operation with the portfolio and project managers. Very often companies already have in place a Project Portfolio Management framework and there may be a need to integrate your enterprise architecture with that.

As an example, PMI has introduced a standard for Portfolio Management, and portfolio managers have a resource to help them develop professionally and achieve success for themselves and their enterprise. Within an organization, a portfolio represents a collection of active programs, projects and other work undertaken at a specific point in time to help the organization achieve strategic objectives. In essence, a portfolio reflects the priorities, investments and resource allocations.

Project Portfolio Management (PPM) may be part of an enterprise governance framework. It is a management process designed to help the organization-:

-To ensure that the organization is doing the "right things", optimally allocating scarce resources toward the enterprise’s objectives
-To acquire and view information about all projects
-To sort and prioritize each project according to certain criteria, such as strategic value, resource impact, cost, and so on.

PPM has several activities which are similar to the objectives of managing a financial portfolio:

-The identification of all the individual demands in the portfolio
-The development of a "big picture" view and a deeper understanding of the collection as a whole
-The sensible sorting, adding, and removing of items from the collection based on their costs, benefits, and alignment with long-term strategies or goals.

In a nutshell, Portfolio Management can help zero in on the projects that are most worth their effort; project management can help execute those projects most efficiently.

These activities can be perfectly integrated with Phase F of TOGAF. Once the work packages, projects and building blocks inventory is created, the enterprise architecture team with the portfolio managers (and other important stakeholders) will examine each project and prioritize it according to established criteria. They will probably assign a business value; conduct a cost business analysis for each project (done in collaboration with business people); identify the risks to the projects.

The overall list of projects is then considered to develop a well-balanced list of supported projects and provide an input for a detailed implementation and migration plan. It will also help to confirm the Transition Architecture defined in the phase E. The use of an Architecture definition increments table is highly recommended to list these projects.

Some projects will be given high priority and extensive support, some will be given moderate priority, and still others will be placed on hold or dropped entirely from the list. This will also help to finalize the Architecture roadmap. Finally, resources will need to be identified and made available.

Other Governance domains may also be to be integrated in the PPM process and Phase F, such as Risk Management (e.g. RiskIT), Project Management (e.g. PMI, PRINCE 2), etc.

Companies who are mature in Portfolio Management activities may integrate their existing work practices easily with TOGAF. This would enforce the relationship between the Enterprise Architecture team and the PMO (or the PPM team).

(You can also refer to another post: Why do we not find yet links between Enterprise Architecture and Project Portfolio Management? )

6 comments:

Hamid said...

Nice article.
Can you elaborate what is the most likely outcome of a strategic business change in Phase H: Architecture Change Management.

Serge Thorn said...

Hamid,
strategic business change has to be included in the phase H. There are various categories of such changes:
Business-as-usual developments
Business exceptions
Business innovations
Business technology innovations
Strategic change

PaweĊ‚ Zubkiewicz said...

Hi.

I read your post and I must say that your vision of the relationship between TOGAF (in particular Phase H) and PPM is not quite clear to me.

Are your sure that you're talking about right phase in TOGAF AMD cycle? In my opinion "create a viable implementation and migration plan in co-operation with the portfolio and project managers" and "examine each project and prioritize it according to established criteria. [...] assign a business value; conduct a cost business analysis for each project" are objectives of phase F not H.
I assume that's a typo. Am I right?

Could you also clarify when does the PPM and AMD phases work together, please? In my personal opinion it's mainly in Phase G and in lesser extent F and H. What do you think?

Serge Thorn said...

Hi Pawel,
absolutely well spotted. This is a terrible mistake...probably a typo. No one raised this before you...many thanks!

Serge Thorn said...

Regarding your second comment. Phase G is the implementation, which means development or acquisition of a COTS package. This would require Project Management methods such as PMI, PRINCE 2 and others. PPM includes the portfolio aspects which are not considered in Phase G. Hope this clarifies!

Nathaniel @ pmi project management said...

Great post. I have learned more about Project Portfolio Management(and the extra explanation in the comments).

Thanks for the post. Keep it up!